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Welding Technology In The Building Arctic Class Tug & Excellent Automatic Welding Robot

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Published on 22 Sep 2023 / In Film & Animation

Hello all of you. Welcome back to X-Machines channel. Since welding became widely used in the 1930s, it has changed the mechanical engineering industry by leaps and bounds. Especially in the shipbuilding industry, before every ship was constructed on the building berth from the keel upward, which takes a lot of labor and time because of the complexity of this method. The modern method of applying welding machines and technologies makes the construction of ships much simpler, faster and more efficient. For a hands-on look at this method of shipbuilding, X-Machines visited the Foss Rainier, Ore shipyard to explore the process of building Arctic Class tugs.
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sbseed
sbseed 10 months ago

a stupid way to build a tug in my opinion, i would use a dry dock and build the tug so that the engine compartment can be opened easily if the engines need to be replaced and refit...
instead of having to take apart half the boat to get to the engines, not to mention time intensive and inefficient.

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Life_N_Times_of_Shane_T_Hanson

Hmmmm possibly, but if it ws such a fucked way to build ships and ALL of these HUGE specialist companies are all refining their construction and assembly methods to the point they are building massive ships in the space of months... Since labour, materials, time, and the effiency of the ship - being the weight, and capacity - for power and or cargo, means the running cost in fuel etc., well the ship building business is fiercely competative - call them, send them the video, or a link to it, and ask them is your method better or is theirs - ask them why - call the engineering dept at 20 different ship yards... all around the world.

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sbseed
sbseed 10 months ago

@Life_N_Times_of_Shane_T_Hanson: no in these cases where they are working for big corporations to order, they fallow the plan or most of the plan drafted by the architects the clients hire... the reason they do it the way they do is for ease of planning and financial concern, because it is easier on the one hand to create blocks instead of planning for the future, the companies that commission these types of boats use them until the engines are dead and then sell em off, they do not care about long term sustainability of the boat itself or any refitting that might be done. they want to make as much money off of it as they can and then dump it for as much money as they possibly can get out of it, usually in sale of metal from breaking it down.

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sbseed
sbseed 10 months ago

@Life_N_Times_of_Shane_T_Hanson: as to cargo, tugs do not have to worry about cargo really, it is the operators/tools/basic parts/luggage and that is it, the engines do all the work because tugs only push/pull cargo such as barges and massive ships such as container ships, they are used to position/menuever them (tankers too) into dock position to be loaded and unloaded then push or tow them out of the channels or wherever to the open see... in the case of barges they tow those on thousand or more foot long cables , the cables themselves are often about 5 inches thick made like modern rope (even though they are metal cables many places call them metal rope, which is ridiculous to me), it is the same for when the big ships/barges/tankers are built, they are not built to last or with keeping them in working order they are built to be used temporarily and then discarded usually for the price of the metal and maybe some of the other things that can be taken off in the ship junkyards, usually in 3rd world countries.

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Life_N_Times_of_Shane_T_Hanson

@sbseed: I dunno - they are significant assetts, and reliability and longevity is a factor in the purchase price... Like one tug costing $10 million and lasting 10 years or another tug costing $12 million lasting 15 years... I think the added expense is worth it.. AND the cost of refurbishment is much lower than the cost of replacement. Like these locomotives https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/....Victorian_Railways_S - say they were all built pre 1960 - they are run until the engines are smoking, and then they strip them, clean them out, crack test the frames, reline the bores, new or refurbished pistons, new main and bottom end bearings - usually relined, clean out the superchargers and turbos, and their filters - new suspension springs and shocks, commutators, rebuilt fuel injection systems etc., etc., etc.. just a scheduled replacement program... and periodic overhaul and these locomotives are pushing 60 years old. and heading towards being 70 + years.... until the frames are materially fucked up and full of cracks that cannot be repaired or there is a real risk of it breaking in 2 etc., the locomotives are going to be run almost forever... Same goes for the tugs - until they get so old that spares are no longer available and they are materially reaching the end of their sea worthy life.. Just keep refurbishing and running them... and then I dunno - all ocean going cargo ships have a design life of typically around 20 - 25 years. It has everything to do with fatiuge cycles on the body - all that flexing and twisting and all that - They can design them and make them to last almost forever, but they would be unable to carry much cargo, they would be heavy and use heaps of fuel etc. But if they design them to be a series of compromises, to be as light as they can be, to carry as much cargo as they can, to use as little fuel as possible, to be as low cost to maintain as possible, and to need the absolute minimum of crew as you can get away with, and it lasts 20 - 25 years, instead of the total cost of ownership making them uncompetitive... Well that is a fair trade off.

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Life_N_Times_of_Shane_T_Hanson

@sbseed: It's all your fault... See rather than buy an American made oil filter for $25, using Amrican labour at $25 an hour, on American made machines costing $25 an hour, using American made transport costing $25 an hour, with American employees driving the trucks, the fuel supplies, the spare parts and maintenance, and the warehouses etc., YOU chose the oil filter made in China, that costs $8, and is shipped in bulk, by the biggest and cheapest to run ships, to America, and it's then sent directly to you by post or a discount auto store, for $12, which makes it your fault for the mass unemployment, the loss of industry, the closures of the manufacturing sectors, and all that.....

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